Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Discuss the Fuel storage & Stability issues and how with the latest emission control requirements, storage & purification of marine fuel oils on board has become a challenge for CE’s.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Discuss the Fuel storage & Stability issues and how with the latest emission control requirements, storage & purification of marine fuel oils on board has become a challenge for CE’s.

    Discuss the Fuel storage & Stability issues and how with the latest emission control requirements, storage & purification of marine fuel oils on board has become a challenge for CE’s.
    Last edited by mohit; 12-21-2017, 10:40 AM.

  • #2
    • Total sediment aged is an important specification for heavy fuels. Currently, nearly all heavy fuel is marketed with the stabilityguarantee of maximum total sediment aged (ISO 10307-2) 0.10%
    • Fuel stability: The potential for fuel to change condition in storage in certain circumstances, depending on its resistance to breakdown
    • Bulk fuel stored for long periods can become unstable – the asphaltene content can precipitate out of solution causing the formation of sludge. This has the potential to block filters and pipes, leaving tanks with an unpumpable residue
    • The ‘break up’ is dependent on the nature of the liquid hydrocarbons in which the asphaltenes are suspended. If the medium is aromatic (hydrocarbons in ring formation) then they will remain in suspension but if it is paraffinic (linear hydrocarbon formation) the asphaltenes may have a propensity to coalesce into sludge. Once a fuel has chemically broken down there is no way to satisfactorily reverse the process. Precipitated asphaltene cannot be re-dissolved
    • Heating Bunker and Settling Tanks prevents water condensation. Heating these beyond the fuel’s flash point temperature, however, maycause explosion, and thermal currents will interfere with sedimentation in settling tanks
    • Avoid Fuel Commingling. If unavoidable, mix them only after checking compatibility. And if compatibility check is not possible, minimize the quantity of one fuel in the mixture
    • Indiscriminate commingling of fuels can lead to stability problems of the final fuel due to the incompatibility of the fuels used as blend components. Eventual issues/damages arising from the commingling of fuels are the responsibility of the individual who decided to blend the fuels. Fuel suppliers guarantee the stability of the fuel they deliver, but cannot be held responsible for compatibility problems with another fuel.
    • Do not blend fuels. If commingling is unavoidable, check the compatibility of the fuels in advance, and make a final decision based on the test result. If a compatibility check is not possible (one component unavailable at the moment the decision has to be made), reduce the amount of one fuel to a minimum before adding the second fuel.

    Last edited by deepak; 12-21-2017, 05:22 PM.

    Comment

    Working...
    X